An interview with author Richard Dee

Richard DeeToday, I have the pleasure of interviewing a writer who you may, or may not, be familiar with; but one, I’m sure you will return to, once you have enjoyed a taste of his excellent, entertaining books and writing style.

Hi Richard, it’s a pleasure to have you here today as my guest. Get comfy and take a deep breath as you’re now under the microscope so to speak! We’re all keen to learn more about you, so fire away.

What’s your earliest memory and your favourite one?

I remember living in Brixham when I was very young. Our house was at the base of what seemed to be a huge cliff, trains ran over the back. The station has long gone, the house was for sale when we were on holiday one year, we almost looked around; in the end, I couldn’t face it. My favourite memory is harder to pin down, I’ve had so many memorable experiences in my life, as most people have, there are all the usual ones, marriage, the birth and achievements of my wife and children., it’s hard to say which one was the best. I think that my favourite one must be when I was twenty, after passing my Second Mates Certificate of Competency and completing my apprenticeship. Standing on the bridge of a ship and realising that I was in charge of it for the next four hours. Exciting and terrifying all at the same time.

Where do you live? And have you travelled much?

I live in Brixham, after retiring here a few years ago. As you might have spotted, I was at sea, in a forty-year career I went to a lot of places. As well as the familiar ones like New York and Cape Town, I went around Cape Horn, travelled 600 miles up the Amazon, spent a lot of time in the South China and around the Indonesian Islands. I was on a ship that was flooded and somehow didn’t sink, survived a collision, a fire in an engine room, and was on a jumbo jet that crash-landed in Johannesburg after a bird flew into an engine. The smell of Sandalwood on the breeze at 3 am, moving across a flat calm sea; shot with phosphorescence, under a sky filled with stars, is another fond memory. I ended my career as a ship’s pilot on the River Thames, taking ships of all sizes through the Thames Barrier, Tower Bridge and up Barking Creek!

Did you have a creative background which guided you towards writing, or was it something you gradually drifted into?

I failed English at school, in fact, I failed all my O levels first time around, largely because I couldn’t be bothered. I had to retake them while working in a supermarket and scraped into the apprenticeship by the skin of my teeth. I never intended to be a writer, I had ideas but never wrote them down. I had trouble writing letters home. My mind must have been storing up all the experiences because one day after I had retired, I had a dream, which I kept having until I wrote it down. I thought, or at least hoped, that writing it down would be the end of it. Then I had another dream, which I realised was connected to the first. After that, I was away and the more I wrote, the more ideas I had. It was like watching a film in my head, I just wrote what I saw. I could slow the film down and rewind, but I could never fast-forward. Even now, after nine novels, I never see the end of a story until I get to it.

Have you a secret desire/dream or ambition you’d care to share with everyone?

Apart from Fortune, Glory and World Domination? Seriously, I’ve had a full life, I’ve been lucky, and I appreciate it. I’m not desperate for huge success, because I think that doesn’t necessarily solve problems, merely adds new and different ones. I’d like people to like what I write, and to be known as someone whose books were enjoyable. When I was just starting out, with one badly edited novel and no clue what I was doing, I received so much help and advice from other authors, for which I’m very grateful. I try to give back as much as I can by encouraging and supporting people who are at the same stage now as I was then, by promoting them and their work on my website. If I can leave my work as a legacy for my children and grandchildren to enjoy and perhaps benefit from in some small way, I think I will have achieved enough.

Which two people would you like to be shipwrecked with? And one you wouldn’t? (You can change the name… )

If I couldn’t take any of my family, they would have to be authors, so that we could swap ideas and develop new plots and characters to while away the time. My heroes include Isaac Asimov, Ray Bradbury and Arthur C Clarke, so if one of them were available, that would be fantastic. As I’m also writing crime fiction, Agatha Christie is a candidate, to help me learn the craft of dropping clues and leading readers astray. I’d also love to know the REAL story of her disappearance in 1926, there have been so many theories, the truth might be more exciting than anything she ever wrote. As for one person I wouldn’t, maybe the ship’s Captain who sacked me on my 21st birthday. Although it eventually got me the job of my dreams, it felt like the end of the world at the time. Other than that, there is nobody that springs to mind.

If someone gave you one million pounds tomorrow, what would you do with it?

That’s far more money than I would ever need. I’m not attracted by fast cars or fancy holidays. I know it sounds cheesy, but after I made sure that my family shared in my good fortune, I’d like to set up a way of using some of it to help people. I don’t know how but I’m sure I could think of a way to make it useful. Money is only energy after all: if you can, you should pass it around, keep it flowing.

You are now well-known as a writer. Have you another talent you keep hidden (like singing)?

I bake bread. When I first retired, as something to do, I started baking bread for a local shop. It was all Organic Sourdough, using Spelt and Rye flour, I also made various rolls, cakes and biscuits. It developed into too much work in the end, especially complying with all the regulations and keeping up with the paperwork. I was supposed to be retired and spending more time with the family. I was starting at 4 a.m. seven days a week and something had to give, I couldn’t stay at the level I was. I was faced with the choice of either expanding the business it had become or stopping, after a lot of deliberation, I stopped. I still bake every week for my family though, occasionally I’ll do something more for a special event. I put baking posts up on my website and I’m always happy to talk about techniques with anyone who’s interested.

Would you rather sit under a tree and read or go for a run?

I’d rather read or write at any time, but I do enjoy walking. Torbay has some beautiful walks, which I used to do with my dogs, before the inevitable happened. Now I still walk the familiar paths on my own, thinking up plots and having conversations between characters, as long as nobody else is in earshot. You get funny looks if you’re not careful.

What’s the funniest thing that has ever happened to you/or the most serious?

At college in 1982, which I was attending to study for my Mates Certificate, I was in the pub and saw a man I hadn’t seen for ages, he had a dark-haired girl with him. I remembered his previous girlfriend, who nobody liked, so after saying hello, I said, “what had happened to the awful blonde you used to hang around with?” It all went quiet as she replied, “I dyed my hair.” Five years later, I was their best man, so I think I got away with that one.

The most serious was probably when my wife was choking, I had to perform the Heimlich manoeuvre on her. There’s a lot that can go wrong, the potential for all sorts of disaster. Once again, I got away with it, as she’s still here.

If you could pass another law, what would it be?

I’d like to make it illegal to be too busy to stop and enjoy yourself. Whether it because of pressure from work, your peers or any other reason, you have to take time to appreciate that you’re alive and take enjoyment from the wonders of the world around you, There’s no need to travel to exotic lands, or spend a fortune on the latest whatever, beauty is around you, it’s free and all you need it to take the time to see it. I learned that on a ship, you might be under pressure to get to the next port or pick up the next cargo, but in the end, you only went at a certain speed, the wind and currents could disrupt your progress and you got there when you did. It’s a valuable lesson, I know we all have things that need doing but there is always five minutes somewhere that you can take for relaxation. You’ll feel better for it.

What, if anything, really tests your patience?

People or organisations who come across as friendly, promise mutual things until you have done what they want, at which point, they don’t reciprocate and dump you. Or people who seem to have missed out on common sense. Fortunately, they seem to be dying out, you still get the odd one though. And traffic lights that turn red as you approach, on an otherwise empty road.

What makes you the happiest and what would you like to be remembered for?

A smile, or a compliment from someone who you’ve never met. I’d like to be remembered as a person who always did their best.

Thank you so much for the interview, Richard. Most revealing! I’m sure your many fans will have enjoyed reading your answers. Wishing you a mountain of good luck and mega sales of your books.

***

You can find out more about Richard on his website at richarddeescifi.co.uk. Head over there to see what he gets up to, click the FREE STUFF tab or the PORTFOLIO tab to get all the details about his work and pick up a free short story!

Richard is also on Facebook and Twitter

Some of Richard’s books:

 

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43 thoughts on “An interview with author Richard Dee

  1. willowdot21 06/02/2019 / 6:30 pm

    Thank you Joy that was a great interview and I really enjoyed it, Richard is a very interesting chap.

    Richard I really enjoyed learning about you .🤗💜

    • joylennick 06/02/2019 / 8:53 pm

      Thanks Willowdot, Richard comes across as a really nice guy, doesn’t he.x

      • willowdot21 06/02/2019 / 9:37 pm

        Yes he really does and interesting 💜

    • richarddeescifi 07/02/2019 / 12:57 pm

      Glad you enjoyed my answers, thanks for commenting. R.

      • willowdot21 07/02/2019 / 6:50 pm

        It was a very interesting interview 😁

  2. Jill Weatherholt 06/02/2019 / 7:12 pm

    What a fantastic interview, Joy…great questions. I did chuckle about his friend’s “blonde” girlfriend. 🙂

    • richarddeescifi 07/02/2019 / 12:58 pm

      Thanks to Joy for the chance to tell you a little about me.

  3. joylennick 06/02/2019 / 8:54 pm

    Thanks Jill. I too thoroughly enjoyed his answers… x

  4. calmkate 06/02/2019 / 10:56 pm

    great interview and a most interesting character … his comment about stopping to enjoy resonated loudest 🙂

    • richarddeescifi 07/02/2019 / 12:59 pm

      thank you, It’s important to take time to just ‘be’.

      • calmkate 07/02/2019 / 9:28 pm

        most certainly …

    • richarddeescifi 07/02/2019 / 1:00 pm

      Glad you enjoyed it, I had fun answering some different questions to what I usually get asked.

  5. joylennick 07/02/2019 / 10:12 am

    Thanks, Jan. Richard comes across as a really nice guy.xx

  6. richarddeescifi 07/02/2019 / 12:56 pm

    Thanks to everyone who commented and enjoyed my answers. And to Joy of course, for giving me the opportunity.

  7. Don Massenzio 07/02/2019 / 1:18 pm

    Reblogged this on DSM Publications and commented:
    Check out this interview with author Richard Dee as featured in this post from Joy Lennick’s blog.

    • richarddeescifi 07/02/2019 / 5:42 pm

      Thanks for the share, Don.

    • richarddeescifi 07/02/2019 / 9:16 pm

      Thanks, Sue.

      • Sue Vincent 07/02/2019 / 10:25 pm

        My pleasure, Richard.

    • richarddeescifi 08/02/2019 / 6:35 am

      Thank you

    • joylennick 08/02/2019 / 12:13 pm

      Dear Ann, Thank you so much for reblogging. Much appreciated. Best wishes.

  8. Bette A. Stevens 08/02/2019 / 2:46 am

    Love the Q & A… Personal and informative. Nice meeting Richard on your blog today, Joy. 🙂

    • richarddeescifi 08/02/2019 / 6:36 am

      I’m glad you enjoyed my answers, thanks for commenting

  9. joylennick 08/02/2019 / 10:02 am

    So pleased you enjoyed it, Bette.Thank you. x

    • richarddeescifi 08/02/2019 / 3:33 pm

      Thanks for reblogging

  10. joylennick 08/02/2019 / 12:15 pm

    Reblogging is much appreciated. Many thanks, Anita. x

  11. Darlene 08/02/2019 / 6:15 pm

    A great interview. I love that Richard doesn’t know the end of his books until he is almost there. I am the same but some people find that hard to believe. You have had an interesting life, Richard. No doubt your experiences fuel your stories. All the best.

    • richarddeescifi 08/02/2019 / 9:17 pm

      It’s been fun, living it, remembering it and writing about it. I love reaching the end, knowing that it will be found in exactly the same way (with the same effect) by the reader. Thank you for commenting.

  12. D. Wallace Peach 09/02/2019 / 8:59 pm

    Thanks so much for the intro to Richard, Joy. It seems he has a great attitude and generosity regarding life. And I always love meeting other writers of speculative fiction! Great interview. 🙂

    • richarddeescifi 10/02/2019 / 10:17 am

      Thank you for commenting.

  13. joylennick 09/02/2019 / 10:38 pm

    Thanks Diane. I love doing interviews (you any time…) I’m fascinated by human beings and it’s amazing what ‘comes through’ an individual’s writing. xx.

  14. Robert 10/02/2019 / 3:10 pm

    SciFi is my genre, I love Issac Asimov! I love Dee’s idea for a new law and that he would give away money to help others. Cool dude!

    • richarddeescifi 10/02/2019 / 9:39 pm

      Hi Robert, thanks for commenting.

  15. joylennick 10/02/2019 / 9:17 pm

    Thank you, Robert. Yep, Richard does sound like a ‘cool dude’ doesn’t he! x

    • richarddeescifi 12/02/2019 / 8:01 am

      Thanks for reading, and commenting. I try!!!

  16. joylennick 16/02/2019 / 12:56 pm

    More thanks, Sally. Your birthday celebrations sounded great! For my 66th Ann. I had flowers, chocolates, pink champagne and a very tasty meal in a new (to us) restaurant. Thoroughly spoiled! Have a good weekend. Hugs xx

  17. Frank Prem 17/02/2019 / 8:24 am

    Nice one, Joy and Richard. Great to read about Richard in his own words.

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