Interview with Esmé of esmesalon.com

Esme_editedHi Esmé, your fame for sharing, promoting and blogging has preceded you, so who better to interview? It’s common knowledge that we are either leaders or followers, and I come firmly in the latter category, so am the ideal person to start the inquisition. Oops, I mean interview… I promise it will be painless.

I’m delighted to welcome you here today so I can nose around. I have, suitably laced your coffee – as you like it – so let’s make a start.

Where were you born and how long did you live there?

Hi Joy, before I start to answer your questions, please may I take this opportunity to thank you for your generosity, lovely coffee with a dash of …. and your awesome company.

OK, I was born in a then small village called Bellville, close to Cape Town in South Africa. We lived in a coastal village called Somerset West, Cape Province in South Africa for 40 years before we left with our family and immigrated to Vancouver, Canada.

Do you have any special memories of the early years and when you started school? And what were your favourite subjects?

I started school and must admit that was never my favourite pass time. I would rather have stayed out and about on the sport grounds and participated in all type of sport activities. I played, netball, hockey, did all kinds of track events as long jump and high jump to name a few.

I was never a great school achiever, but made do and passed all my grades. In high school my best subjects were “Home Economics”

Home economics, domestic science or home science is a field of study that deals with the relationship between individuals, families, communities, and the environment in which they live. Home economics courses are offered internationally and across multiple educational levels.

typewriterTyping and yes I started to type on one of these (Picture right), then after my school education and Pittman Shorthand (Shorthand means writing by hand using various symbols to write quickly) I went to a Technical College and graduated as an Office Secretary (that’s what we were called back in those days).

 
Then, while working at various departments at the University of Stellenbosch, I gradually started to work on a computer with a floppy disk (for those that does not know what this means: It is a magnetic storage medium for computer systems) as well as a Teletype machine with a ticker tape – WOW, I am giving away my age with all this information.
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What sort of child/teenager were you?

I was a very quiet and reserved child and teenager. Keeping to myself, never part of the crowd, doing my own thing alone. Never then, and not even now, a party animal. If I had to go to a party, I always ended up as the ‘wallflower’ and keeping myself company until enough time passed in order for me to be excused and leave for home. Not very exciting, but that’s me – as I am one of those extremely introverted personality type and conservative specimens.

Were you a practical child or a dreamer?

Being an introvert and doing my own thing, I tended to be a dreamer, but when I had to I could be practical and get things done. The reason for thing being I usually had to figure it out for myself as I did not do the crowd and team thing well.

Have you always been good at organizing and taking charge?

Yes, I have always been very methodical, and organized, but not taking charge of anything in a group. Remember, I said “INTROVERT”.

What genre do you prefer to read?

As a child I did not read books as you would think, so no specific genre, unless you call ‘Cooking and baking” a genre.

Did you have aspirations to write when younger?

Write, me? No, never. The introvert in me will never be able to put pen to paper, or fingers to a modern electric typewriter to write a novel.

What is your favourite way of relaxing?

In the kitchen, cooking and baking up a storm for my family and friends.

Favourite hobby?

It may be rather obvious, but I love cooking and baking, and then something not known to many, I love to do pin pricking and create hand stitched greetings cards.

Who do you admire?

My mentor and previous Boss, CHAIRMAN EMERITUS of the company and retired. He is a true gentlemen and a mensch, a person of integrity and honour. I have learned so much from him during my tenure at his company. Although he has retired, I am in a fortunate position to still meet with him as he is a friend and not only my former Boss.

If you won a million tomorrow, what would you do with it?

Without a doubt in my mind, help our children to pay off their debts and get a good footing in life to continue and make an even bigger success as what they have done to date. After that, take a sabbatical from work and do a yearlong travel and see the world.

What are your top hates / loves?

My biggest pet peeves:

People who talk while their mouth is full of food.
People constantly on their mobile phone while in company and/or while you talk to them.
Rude and inconsiderate people.

Loves:

My husband, soulmate and best friend and then our children and grandkids.
The beach at sunset, breeze in the hair, waves lapping at the shore.
A nice hot cup of coffee is the cure to almost anything.

If you could pass another/change a law, what would it be?

Equal Rights.

Name three things for a bucket list…

Visit Thailand
A trip to the Maldives
See the Northern Lights in Yukon

Has your life turned out the way you thought it would?

Pretty much, yes, I would say so. I have a wonderful husband; (a girl cannot ask for more). Two awesome children, now adults with families of their own. Four (2 on each side) grandkids and a job that I love and happy with.

Although we moved to Vancouver, Canada more than 22 years ago, I will not give it up for anything, as we have an incredible and awesome life here, way better than we would have had in South Africa. Do not get me wrong, we will never deny our heritage, but facts are facts and we are here and incredibly fortunate for the wonderful life we have in Vancouver Canada and this is HOME to us. We are proud to be Canadians.

Yes, we do miss it to be closer to our family from time to time, but fortunately, we can from time to time go and visit them, on the other side of the globe, when the longing gets too much.

Thank you so much, Esme. What an interesting life you’ve lead. I know you are always busy, so really appreciate your time.

You can find a wealth of recipes, fascinating interviews and masses of great blogging and social media activities on Esmé’s website: esmesalon.com

© Copyright Joy Lennick 2019

Eat, drink and be Mary

“IF YOU CAN’T FEED A HUNDRED PEOPLE, THEN JUST FEED ONE”

Mother Theresa

I recently edited an exciting tale of a ‘one man marvel’ who was a cross between James Bond, Captain Scarlet, and Batman. It certainly moved apace, with plenty of car and bikes chases, shoot-outs and mayhem. Perfect Boy’s/Men’s Own stuff. Only one thing about the story bugged me. Our hero rarely ate.

He downed a few jars that I recall, but seemed on a starvation diet. I do, of course, appreciate that when one is pursuing dangerous criminals, intent on murder, or blowing up the Houses of Parliament, et al, indulging in coq au vin and chocolate mousse has to take a back seat, but as chapters passed like indulgent buses, the poor hero was, surely, losing weight?! I was mentally urging the author to serve him a quick pizza, hot dog or burger at the very least., but as there was a war on by then, the poor devil had to make do with stolen eggs and stale bread…Hey ho.

As individuals, and being unique, we all have our fancies, likes and dislikes, and there’s nothing I like more than to eat a good meal, and digest it curled up by the wood-burner with a good book. But it goes much deeper than that and I’m no detective on a case…As a wife and mother, I took to cooking early on in my marriage, and my husband and I liked entertaining so much, he caught the culinary bug and – at one time in our years together – we ran a modest, twelve-bedroomed hotel in Bournemouth. Hard work but great fun and it launched me on a writing path: Running Your Own Small Hotel and Jobs in Baking and Confectionery. Both published by Kogan Page Ltd, London.

Involved in research for the book, I came across some exciting revelations, such as Chilean-American writer, Isabel Allende’s love for and allusions to food in her books. One: Aphrodite, covered the aphrodisiac combinations of food and love, and actual recipes from the book are still used by readers today. “A cornucopia of spices…” and potent writing of rich, dark chocolate, oozing, seductively and sexily through the pages, with titillating aromas almost escaping from the words. Sadly, my personal flights of food fancy were rejected and I was commissioned to write an account of “The day to day running of a small hotel, with modest menu suggestions.” Disappointing, but the book went to a second printing and did very well, so I couldn’t complain.

Later, leading a more prosaic, while interesting and rewarding life, I read and wrote as much as I could in between cooking for four men, noting that Oscar Wilde once said: “After a good dinner, one can forgive anybody, even one’s own relations!”

Apparently, Alexander Dumas was also a cook and gourmet, and while his three musketeers were marinating in his imagination, he wrote Dictionnaire de Cuisine, but concocted over-fanciful tales about the Romans driving ducks over the Alps for their dinner.

Tragic, American-born poet Sylvia Plath loved to cook and it seems that some of her recipes “ghost the web;” one for “Tomato soup cake” sounds rather strange!

In A Moveable Feast, Ernest Hemingway, his pockets at the time, empty, wrote of his hunger while his stomach rumbled and the teasing aromas of baking bread and rolls drifted, torturously, from the open doorways of the Boulangeries.

As for the infamous Tom Jones, written by Henry Fielding in 1749 – marked as one of the “best ever 100 books” – although I admit to not having read it, I did see the film. And if ever food was linked to love and sex hilariously, it was in this epic. It is incredible to note that from a London population of only 700,000, 10,000 copies of the book were sold. One critic helped sales along beautifully, by calling it “A motley history of barstardism, fornication and adultery.” I never looked at food the same way again…

While I continued to scribble away and cook such basic temptations as Shepherd’s Pie, Toad in the Hole, Goulash and innumerable stir fries and roasts like most other mums, I still took time out to read – often in the kitchen. Joanne Harris’ book Chocolate captured me hook, line and sinker. I loved it, and although I haven’t written a “foodie” novel, yet, I did manage to get a few, culinary-based, stories published in an anthology: Food Glorious Food (QG Publishing) which, hopefully, sent a few taste buds salivating… and there are more due in a collection of fascinating, mixed stories by writer Jean Wilson and yours truly called Angels & Demons, also to be published shortly by QG Publishing.

Luckily, since publishing my memoir My Gentle War, I’ve been able to send modest donations to Mary’s Meals, a wonderful charity in Scotland who feed over One Million children per day and only keep a paltry seven pence in the pound for administration costs…

Website: www.marysmeals.org
Email: info@marysmeals.org